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Pollen, Allergies, and a Happy Easter

Easter Flowers and Pollen

Spring is swinging into action and with Easter on the horizon we’re reminded of the beauty of Earth’s annual rebirth as plants go into full bloom.  While the promise of amazing flowers and leaf-laden trees presents hope for the year, it also brings pollen season back into action.  Instead of worrying about mold in the corners of your home and spores in the air, now our concerns turn to insects and the clinging of pollen that heralds a step towards allergy-season.

How to Prevent Pollen in Your Home

While pollen is a necessary evil and part of the Earth’s natural cycle, it steps up the need for allergy medications and regular in-home cleaning.  Fortunately, spring isn’t when the worst allergies come to bear for the US (that’s in the fall when the majority of the US is awash in ragweed pollen which can span hundreds of miles per plant) but we still have to deal with trees and plants releasing pollen into the air.  Fortunately, there are a few things you can do to help keep the air in your home clear of excess pollen.

  1. Change Your Filters – Yes, it’s a basic maintenance requirement, but you should change out your home’s air filter every 3-6 months. Three months is best during high-pollen or dust seasons or if you find yourself running the central air often.  A good way to remember is by writing the date of installation on the air filter itself to help you identify how long it’s been.
  2. Leave Shoes at the Door – Stamp your feet on an outdoor mat to remove as much dust and pollen as possible before entering, then leave your shoes by the door. A lot of pollen is picked up by shoes (and socks) as we walk around outside.  Walking back to your room to remove shoes will track all of that dust and pollen into your home where it settles into the carpet, curtains, and upholstery to be shuffled about the room whenever something is disturbed.
  3. Hang Jackets Near the Door –Just like shoes, your clothes pick up a lot of pollen as you walk around outside. If the weather is cool enough to allow for a light jacket or a suit coat, use one while walking around.  Pollen will stick to it instead of your regular clothes.  You can leave this exterior layer at the door of your home and keep from tracking additional particulates and allergens into your home.
  4. Vacuum Regularly – Honestly, this is just good advice. Regular vacuuming and dusting will help keep allergens to a minimum by removing pet dander, skin cells, dirt, dust, and pollen to a minimum.  Clean out your vacuum’s filter and air bag for maximum cleaning potential and don’t forget to clean furniture and curtains as well.
Easter Flowers and Pollen

Spring is swinging into action and with Easter on the horizon we’re reminded of the beauty of Earth’s annual rebirth as plants go into full bloom.  While the promise of amazing flowers and leaf-laden trees presents hope for the year, it also brings pollen season back into action.  Instead of worrying about mold in the corners of your home and spores in the air, now our concerns turn to insects and the clinging of pollen that heralds a step towards allergy-season.

How to Prevent Pollen in Your Home

While pollen is a necessary evil and part of the Earth’s natural cycle, it steps up the need for allergy medications and regular in-home cleaning.  Fortunately, spring isn’t when the worst allergies come to bear for the US (that’s in the fall when the majority of the US is awash in ragweed pollen which can span hundreds of miles per plant) but we still have to deal with trees and plants releasing pollen into the air.  Fortunately, there are a few things you can do to help keep the air in your home clear of excess pollen.

  1. Change Your Filters – Yes, it’s a basic maintenance requirement, but you should change out your home’s air filter every 3-6 months. Three months is best during high-pollen or dust seasons or if you find yourself running the central air often.  A good way to remember is by writing the date of installation on the air filter itself to help you identify how long it’s been.
  2. Leave Shoes at the Door – Stamp your feet on an outdoor mat to remove as much dust and pollen as possible before entering, then leave your shoes by the door. A lot of pollen is picked up by shoes (and socks) as we walk around outside.  Walking back to your room to remove shoes will track all of that dust and pollen into your home where it settles into the carpet, curtains, and upholstery to be shuffled about the room whenever something is disturbed.
  3. Hang Jackets Near the Door –Just like shoes, your clothes pick up a lot of pollen as you walk around outside. If the weather is cool enough to allow for a light jacket or a suit coat, use one while walking around.  Pollen will stick to it instead of your regular clothes.  You can leave this exterior layer at the door of your home and keep from tracking additional particulates and allergens into your home.
  4. Vacuum Regularly – Honestly, this is just good advice. Regular vacuuming and dusting will help keep allergens to a minimum by removing pet dander, skin cells, dirt, dust, and pollen to a minimum.  Clean out your vacuum’s filter and air bag for maximum cleaning potential and don’t forget to clean furniture and curtains as well.

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